Yogadopa classes at Neuromotion Victoria start SEPT 11th!

Yogadopa and Neuromotion Physiotherapy Victoria are running 12 PARKINSON’S YOGA CLASSES Thursdays from 3:30-4:30pm starting September 11th.

I have some research/conference travel on a few Thursdays, so the dates are as follows:

September 11, 18; October 2, 9, 23, 30; November 13, 20, 27; December 4, 11, 18.

Sessions will focus on posture, balance, strengthening the core, opening the chest, flexibility and range of motion.

Classes are $15/session: sign up for all 12-sessions AND drop-ins welcome (please phone ahead to make sure there is space). All equipment and handouts provided. Both persons living with Parkinson’s and care partners welcome! Looking forward to seeing you there!

 
For more information or to register (space is limited!), contact Neuromotion at 250.590.7878 or neuromotionvictoria@gmail.com
see you on your mat. much love
yogadopa-neuromotion-fall-2014
Advertisements

yogadopa summer workshops!

I’m excited to announce that Yogadopa and Neuromotion Physiotherapy are running TWO YOGA FOR PARKINSON’S SUMMER WORKSHOPS!

Thursday July 17th will cover some core (abdominal) work, focus on postural alignment andgentle opening of the chest... Great for anyone with a stooped posture and will provide some take-home tips!

Thursday August 21st will focus on finding our feet on the floor, work on activating the leg muscles, and building a solid foundation to help with balance… This session will really address balance issues and provide some advice for practicing at-home! 

If you’re unsure, here’s what people have to say about past Yogadopa classes:

“Kate’s classes are targeted directed at PD’ers. Her knowledge base, instructional and empathetic nature make the course fun and beneficial”

“Kaitlyn is a born teacher. She integrates her knowledge of movement, yoga and Parkinson’s into her sessions directly and meaningfully. Creating a positive feeling in the mind and body.”

Please contact Neuromotion Physiotherapy to register or with any other questions! Looking forward to it. Much love.

Coffee-drug for Parkinson’s and dementias?

We have been told the benefits of caffeine (see more info HERE).

790078 009

790078 006

What researchers are finding is that caffeine, the world’s most widely used drug, does more than wake people up. Caffeine is linked to improvements in memory and appears to protect against the destruction of brain cells. One of the results find that people who drank two or more cups of coffee a day had a 40 percent lower risk of developing Parkinson’s.

Because of these findings, some companies have been designing drugs to replicate the benefits of caffeine. The challenge is to go beyond the buzz of caffeine to achieve a more powerful effect on the brain — without side effects like headaches, irritability and jitters. But this hasn’t been easy. For example, Merck ended development of such a treatment for Parkinson’s disease last year after late-stage testing suggested it didn’t work. Other developers have postponed plans.

There is no cure for Parkinson’s. Drug developers are focusing on the way caffeine targets sites in an area deep in the brain called the basal ganglia, which is affected by Parkinson’s and plays a key role in movement. The medicines specifically aims to target and block adenosine A2A receptors. The goal of drug-makers is to improve movement in Parkinson’s; existing treatments become less effective over time, and side effects harder to endure.

… what are your thoughts on a “coffee pill” for the brain? Do you consume caffeine? much love.

more information and adapted from: bloom.bg/1gGePNm

Mind, Mood and Parkinson’s: Headway Conference

Last month I attended Headway’s annual conference on cognitive aspects of Parkinson’s disease.

IMG_2593

IMG_2599

IMG_2598

The event was wonderfully organized and had a great lineup of speakers!

The event started with watching Jillian Carson‘s video submission on her experience with Parkinson’s that won the people’s choice award at WPC 2013 in Montreal. You can watch her video HERE

IMG_2596

Dr. Gheis did a great job of discussing depression and anxiety in PD. He highlighted how common those are experienced and differentiated their symptoms from those of PD.

IMG_2600

I was honoured to lead a guided meditation/relaxation after lunch. We had a packed room; it is always nice to meditate in a group and share that supportive energy with each other. I hope everyone enjoyed their experience and will be able to integrate some mindful time into their daily schedules.

IMG_2602

THANK YOU to Moksana Yoga for lending us the props, so our participants could get extra comfy and really relax.

IMG_2601

Dr. Henri-Bhargava and Dr. Sira finished off the day by discussing cognitive aspects of PD and how we can manage those. Headway plans to post videos of the speakers presentation on their website/in their library.

Thanks again for including me in this day and bringing attention to the oh-so-important “non-motor” aspects of Parkinson’s. much love.

yogadopa @ neuromotion… starting April 3rd!

 

 

 

Exciting news!!

I have partnered with Neuromotion Physiotherapy Victoria and will be offering weekly “Yogadopa” classes for persons with Parkinson’s disease starting Thursday April 3rd from 330-430pm at Neuromotion (531 Yates St. Suite 303 Victoria BC).

 The classes will run for 12-weeks (*no class June 19, last class June 26th) and will cost $150 for the 12 weeks or $15/drop in. All equipment will be provided (yoga mats, blocks, chairs), however, participants are asked to bring a towel with them.

Please call (250.590.7878) or email (neuromotionvictoria@gmail.com) Neuromotion to register and guarantee your spot. Space is limited. Visa, debit, cheque or cash accepted (to Neuromotion) for payment.If necessary, please inquire about parking when registering. If wanting to drop-in, please phone ahead to ensure space is available.

 

see you on the mat! much love.

yogadopa_neuromotion

Applications of Yoga in Parkinson’s disease (Roland, 2014)

It’s published!

FINAL (Roland, 2014)

You can access the FULL article here. It is a systematic review summarizing all the available published research on yoga for Parkinson’s disease (which wasn’t much…).

Preliminary data suggested modest improvements in functional mobility, balance, upper- and lower-limb flexibility, and lower-limb strength. The presented evidence also showed improvements in nonphysical factors, such as mood and sleep.

This is important because improved mobility, balance, and lower-extremity function can reduce the fear of falling and functional declines related to inactivity. Also, upper-body flexibility supports postural stability and daily living activities, such as reaching for items on the top shelf.

While the evidence is limited (meaning there’s not a lot of studies, and the study quality is not high), it does suggest that there are some benefits, both physical and related to well-being, that deserve greater investigation. But we still have a long way to go with respect to quality scientific research supporting the the benefits of yoga…

This article represents my passion in life. I hope to encourage other scientists (and hopefully myself in future projects, if the grant-gods agree!) to examine yoga with the same scientific standards we do other randomized controlled exercise trials, and give scientific backing to all those benefits us yogis feel within us.

I’m so happy to share this with you and would love to hear your thoughts on the evidence presented, or if you have any questions! much love.

Sleep in Parkinson’s disease

Last week, I posted about a recent scientific understanding of WHY we need sleep (see post HERE).

There are all kinds of benefits to getting enough sleep:  It’s good for your heart, it may reduce stress, and even prevent cancer.

More importantly, sleep is good for your brain – especially working memory… the kind essential to daily function.

People with Parkinson’s have difficulty sleeping; including difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, restless legs and vivid nightmares. However, the link between sleep disorders and Parkinson’s has yet to be scientifically determined.

Peeraully et al. (Mov Disord 2012) report a higher prevalence of subjective sleepiness, increase in daytime sleepiness, rapid eye movement behaviour disorder in persons with Parkinson’s compared to controls

If you’re interested in learning more about sleep disorders in Parkinson’s, the National Parkinson Foundation and Tanya Simuni, MD have a great video about the topic… you can watch it below. Sweet dreams and much love.

For more on sleep and Parkinsons:

Michael J Fox Foundation

Mov Disord. 2012