coping skills for parkinson’s care partners – PDF expert briefing

I attended an online presentation from the Parkinson Disease Foundation on coping skills for PD caregivers, in honour of National Family Caregivers Month.

my grampy, who had PD, and his loving wife and eventual caregiver (1991).

my grampy and his formal caregivers at the care home.

Dr. Julie Carter, from the Parkinson Centre of Oregon, spoke about how caregivers are integral to the emotional and physical health of the persons with PD.

She spoke on how stress impacts the mind-body and introduced a concept called the “self care toolbox”.

1. Stress affects the mind-body

Due to stress, caregivers have chronically elevated levels of cortisol, which can be toxic to your cells!

Also, with increased stress, our telomeres (protective caps of DNA/chromosomes) get shorter! This is related to rapid aging and shorter life expectance.

This makes stress-managment important! But first, we need to recognize the signs of stress…

  • exhaustion
  • anger
  • depression
  • frustration
  • resentfulness
  • irritability
  • sadness
  • loneliness
  • sleep deprivation
  • panic attacks
  • anxious
  • colds, ulcers and other physical complaints

What to do? Tracking these signs of stress and noting the surrounding environment and situation when you feel the sign can help identify triggers/patterns of stress.

2. Self-care toolbox

The following are 7 skills that can help caregivers care for themselves and thus better care for their loved one

  • Self-compassion. Caregiving jobs are one of the hardest, so don’t be hard on yourself! Find support, be non-judgmental and know you are not alone.
  • Connections. Make good social networks that help you problem solve (support groups, family, friends, formal support). Learn to ASK for help – most people want to help you but don’t know how. Take advantage of formal support.
  • Communication. Express your emotions (through journaling, art, counselling, conversation) so you can communicate more effectively and meaningfully with your spouse. *Note: PD changes communication (i.e. lack of facial expression, quiet voice, slow response time, lack of spontaneous gestures), so you need to be more present and engaged.
  • Optimism. Change the patterns of automatic negative emotions/behaviours/beliefs. You can change the situation but you can change how you feel about it and behave.
  • Flexible/creative problem solving. Identify a problem and come up with a variety of ways to deal with it… try something new and be willing to try again!
  • Care for yourself. This is a necessity, not a luxury! Identify pleasurable activities (i.e. morning coffee, walking the dog, exercise with friends) and track how you feel when you are doing this activity… it’s not superfluous if it makes you feel GOOD!
  • Take charge. Focus on what you can control.

If you are interested, you can see the entire presentation here.

And a HUGE thank you to all the caregivers for everything that you do! Happy caring and much love.

P.S. want more caregiver care? See HERE , HERE and HERE.

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3 thoughts on “coping skills for parkinson’s care partners – PDF expert briefing

  1. Finally!! Someone who understands. I don’t lnow how you found my blog but THANK YOU so much. This is like seeing a light at the end.Ninety percent of what I write about is Parkinson’s or care giver related. It is how I maintain a finger hold on sanity. God bless you.

  2. Pingback: Gait, Balance and Falls – PDF expert briefing | kaitlyn roland

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